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BALI NORTH SIDE and DOLPHIN TOUR



Product Description


BALI NORTH SIDE and DOLPHIN TOUR

03:00 - Pick up at hotel

Lovina Beach

Rent a traditional boat to see dolphin

Breakfast at local restaurant

Hot spring water at Banjar Village

Brahma Vihara Buddhist Temple

Beratan Lake and Ulun Danu Temple at Bedugul Village

Lunch at Bedugul area

Back to hotel


OR


06:00 - Pick up at hotel

Lovina Beach

Swim with the dolphin (for Circus and healthy treatment)

Breakfast at local restaurant

Hot spring water at Banjar Village

Brahma Vihara Buddhist

Beratan Lake and Ulun Danu Temple at Bedugul Village

Lunch at Bedugul area

Back to hotel


Tour price : Rp 700.000 / car  (2 - 7 persons)

Included   : Full AC Private Car, Gasoline, Balinese English speaking driver, Sarong, Scarf

Excluded  : Entrance Fee, Guide at Temple, Snack, Soft drink, Water, Lunch

Duration  : 10 - 12 hours

Overtime  : Rp 50.000 / hour for extra hour (30 minutes = 1 hour)



BALI DOLPHIN TOUR

Dolphin Tour is one of the best Bali One Day Tour Packages to see the Dolphin in Lovina beach, Lovina beach is one of Spectacular beach with Dolphin habitat and perfect place for Watching dolphins in northern Bali Islands. Our Bali Tour Driver will Pickup you early morning about 03.30 Am at your hotel lobby for Bali Dolphin Tour, we will directly to Lovina Beach to catch the traditional outrigger boat to see Dolphin, we will using traditional outrigger boat to go inside the sea of lovina beach, and we will wait in the boat till the dolphin go to surface, after the dolphin go to the surface, you can take picture as many as you like. After watching dolphin at natural habitat with sunrise view and then the tour continue go to  Gitgit Waterfall to see the beautiful waterfall. After visit the waterfall then driver will direct escort you to visit the amazing Ulun Danu Beratan Temple in the lake beratan, the temple situated in Bedugul area. Our professional Bali Tours Driver is always outstanding offer our best services to keep your convenience trip along with private full air-conditioning car transfer to complete your enjoyable on Bali Dolphin Tour. Below is short description places of interest will be visit during Dolphin Tour.


Places of Interest will be visit during Bali Dolphin Tour


Lovina Beach


Lovina is one of the famous tourist places in north part of Bali which own beautiful of calm sea water, blackish chromatic sand and the sea with its dolphin. One of the favorite fascinations in Lovina is dolphin watching tour. Hundreds of dolphins can be seen in the morning time around 1 km offshore. We can see the dolphin attractions in this place like jumping. It is not fail to draw if the tourist has the time to see the sunset here. Lovina area is also supported by the number of tourism fascination which is can be reached from this location. Places of interests around Lovina are Hot Water Banjar, Wihara Budha (Buddies shrine), Gigit Waterfall and some countryside exist around the location.

Location

Lovina is officially located in Kalibukbuk area and covering some countryside like Pemaron, Tukad Mungga, Anturan and Kalibukbuk countryside. Kalibugbug countryside it self is located in Buleleng sub district, meanwhile the Kaliasem and Temukus countryside are located in Banjar sub district where it both of them are belong to Buleleng regency. The eastern countryside is called Pemaron about 5 Km west of Singaraja, and the western countryside is Temukus about 12 Km west of Singaraja.
Lovina Beach is a Tourist Destination in Bali
The centre of activities in Lovina area is located 10 Km from Singaraja town. Nowadays, Lovina area is becoming the center of tourism activities in north part of Bali and offer many kind of accommodations, restaurants, bars, beach activities, art shops, bank, transportations etc. The accommodations in this area are a available from the star hotel class until small hotel even the home stay for the low budget travelers. As a tourist area and center of tourism in Singaraja, Lovina get the biggest visit from tourist who visiting north part of Bali . It is estimated by 90% from tourist who pay a visit to north part of Bali will in Lovina.
History
There are no clear sources or evidence hit the name of Lovina genesis. Pursuant to the reference of the children from Anak Agung Panji Tisna, the clan of famous Buleleng King that the name of Lovina is given by him which is located in Kaliasem countryside, where at the first time he build a bungalow as a resort. He said that the name of Lovina is taken away from a name of small hotel in India that is lafeina whereabouts he stayed and write the book with the title of Ni Ketut Widhi. This book is translated into some languages. In memory of the hotel name, hence the ownership lands give the Lovina name. But there is also other version that is Lovina Name is given caused by its 2 Santen trees are planted by him and grow embracing each other. In this case Lovina is coming from Latin Language that mean is loving each other or love. Then Lovina's name is interpreted as abbreviation from Love and Ina and it is interpreted as Love to Indonesia.



Swimming with the dolphins


Hasil gambar untuk melka hotel swim with dolphins


There are not too many places these days that you can swim with dolphins, but here while you are staying at Bali Sea Villas you can full-fill your dreams by making a booking at Lovina.

They have personal experience of swimming with the dolphins, we can vouch that the dolphins are very well looked after and with no exception are very well behaved and very intelligent not to mention it's great fun and a highlight of any visit to North Bali Sea. The dolphins are very special, three of them were rescued from a circus, they are well treated and seam to enjoy the interaction with people.



Hot Water Spring





Banjar Hot Water is a nature hot wellspring from the ground and it is believed can heal the disease. Its water is accommodated at one small swimming pool encircled by unique rural nature, its situation close to the Wihara (Buda Temple). Banjar Hot Water is located in Banjar Countryside, Banjar sub district and Singaraja Regency. It is about 1,5 Km from Banjar or 24 Km from Singaraja Town. To reach the Hot Water location in Banjar, we can use the motor vehicle through the main road with good condition and passing the Balinese Village with unique culture life. The nearest accommodations like hotels or lodging including restaurants are also available in particular at Lovina Beach area. There are many public transportation also available to connect the travel to Singaraja town. 

Hot Water History

This hot wellspring source is predictably built since of hundreds of year ago and since the Japanese colonize the Indonesia, this place has developed into three pools to relocate the water for taking a bath. The Japanese had also developed its military officer resort close to this area. Having bathing in the heat water containing the brimstone, it will be able to heal the skin disease. This public bath which is built by Japanese now is exploited by public society. Beside of that, now this place is opened for tourist who can use this bathing place to swim in hot pool and also enjoy the water fall. Enjoying the hot water fall, we can feel like squeezing, especially at pool equipped by the douche with the high about 3,5 meters, so that can make the body refresh and relaxation. 

Banjar Hot Water, Places to Visit in North Bali

Hot water in Banjar is progressively recognized to be a place of interest in north of Bali or a tourist destination in Singaraja Bali. Now this place visited by many tourist from local and Foreign countries. It is a mini tourism object which is easily reached from Lovina Beach and it is opened daily from 07.00 am until 18.00 pm daily except Nyepi Day (Silent Day). From Singaraja Town, take the way to Gilimanuk or to the west part of Singaraja and we will meet the Banjar Countryside which is show the direction sigh of this hotel water place. 


Brahmavihara Buddhist Temple


The brahmavihāras (sublime attitudes, lit. "abodes of brahma") are a series of four Buddhist virtues and the meditation practices made to cultivate them. They are also known as the four immeasurables (Sanskrit: apramāṇa, Pāli: appamaññā). The Brahma-viharas are:
  1. loving-kindness or benevolence
  2. compassion
  3. empathetic joy
  4. equanimity
According to the Metta Sutta, cultivation of the four immeasurables has the power to cause the practitioner to be reborn into a "Brahmā realm" (Pāli: Brahmaloka).[3]
The Brahma-viharas, along with meditative tradition associated with Brahma-vihara, are also found in pre-Buddha and post-Buddha Vedic and Sramanic literature.

Etymology & translations

  • Pāli: cattāri brahmavihārā
  • Sanskrit: चत्वारि ब्रह्मविहाराः (IAST: catvāri brahmavihārāḥ)
Brahmavihāra may be parsed as "Brahmā" and "vihāra"; which is often rendered into English as "sublime" or "divine abodes".[4]
Apramāṇa, usually translated as "the immeasurables," means "boundlessness, infinitude, a state that is illimitable".[5] When developed to a high degree in meditation, these attitudes are said to make the mind "immeasurable" and like the mind of the loving Brahmā (gods).[6]
Other translations:
  • English: four divine abodes, four divine emotions, four sublime attitudes, four divine dwellings.[7]
  • East Asia: (traditional Chinese: 四無量心; ; pinyin: Sì wúliàng xīn; Korean: 사무량심; Vietnamese: Tứ Vô Lượng Tâm; literally: "immeasurable states of mind, from apramāṇa-citta"), (traditional Chinese: 四等(心); ; pinyin: sì děng; literally: "four equalities/universals"), (traditional Chinese: 四梵行; ; pinyin: sì fàn xíng; literally: "noble Brahma-acts/characteristics").[8]
  • Tibetan: ཚད་མེད་བཞིWylie: tshad med bzhi or Tibetan: ཚངས་གནས་བཞི་Wylie: tshangs gnas bzhi.

The Brahma-vihara
The four Brahma-vihara are:
  1. Loving-kindness (Pāli: mettā, Sanskrit: maitrī) is active good will towards all
  2. Compassion (Pāli and Sanskrit: karuṇā) results from metta, it is identifying the suffering of others as one's own;
  3. Empathetic joy (Pāli and Sanskrit: muditā): is the feeling of joy because others are happy, even if one did not contribute to it, it is a form of sympathetic joy;
  4. Equanimity (Pāli: upekkhā, Sanskrit: upekṣā): is even-mindedness and serenity, treating everyone impartially
Early Buddhism
The Brahma-vihara are a pre-Buddhist concept, to which the Buddhist tradition gave its own interpretation. The Digha Nikaya asserts the Buddha to be calling the Brahmavihara as "that practice", and he then contrasts it with "my practice" as follows:
...that practice [namely, the mere cultivation of love and so forth, according to the fourfold instructions] is conducive not to turning away, nor to dispassion, nor to quieting, nor to cessation, nor to direct knowledge, nor to enlightenment, nor to nirvana, but only to rebirth in the world of Brahma.

...my practice is conducive to complete turning away, dispassion, cessation, quieting, direct knowledge, enlightenment, and nirvana – specifically the eightfold noble path (...)
— The Buddha, Digha Nikaya II.251, Translated by Harvey B. Aronson
According to Gombrich, the Buddhist usage of the brahma-vihāra originally referred to an awakened state of mind, and a concrete attitude toward other beings which was equal to "living with Brahman" here and now. The later tradition took those descriptions too literal, linking them to cosmology and understanding them as "living with Brahman" by rebirth in the Brahma-world. According to Gombrich, "the Buddha taught that kindness - what Christians tend to call love - was a way to salvation.
In the Tevijja Sutta, The Threefold Knowledge of the Digha Nikaya set of scriptures, Buddha Shākyamuni is asked the way to fellowship/companionship/communion with Brahma. He replies that he personally knows the world of Brahma and the way to it, and explains the meditative method for reaching it by using an analogy of the resonance of the conch shell of the aṣṭamaṅgala:
A monk suffuses the world in the four directions with a mind of benevolence, then above, and below, and all around – the whole world from all sides, completely, with a benevolent, all-embracing, great, boundless, peaceful and friendly mind … Just as a powerful conch-blower makes himself heard with no great effort in all four [cardinal] directions, so too is there no limit to the unfolding of [this] heart-liberating benevolence. This is a way to communion with Brahma.[15]
The Buddha then says that the monk must follow this up with an equal suffusion of the entire world with mental projections of compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity (regarding all beings with an eye of equality).
In the two Metta Suttas of the Aṅguttara Nikāya,[16] the Buddha states that those who practice radiating the four immeasurables in this life and die "without losing it" are destined for rebirth in a heavenly realm in their next life. In addition, if such a person is a Buddhist disciple (Pāli: sāvaka) and thus realizes the three characteristics of the five aggregates, then after his heavenly life, this disciple will reach nibbāna. Even if one is not a disciple, one will still attain the heavenly life, after which, however depending on what his past deeds may have been, one may be reborn in a hell realm, or as an animal or hungry ghost.[17]
In another sutta in the Aṅguttara Nikāya, the laywoman Sāmāvatī is mentioned as an example of someone who excels at loving-kindness.[18] In the Buddhist tradition she is often referred to as such, often citing an account that an arrow shot at her was warded off through her spiritual power.[19]
Visuddhimagga
The four immeasurables are explained in The Path of Purification (Visuddhimagga), written in the fifth century CE by the scholar and commentator Buddhaghoṣa. They are often practiced by taking each of the immeasurables in turn and applying it to oneself (a practice taught by many contemporary teachers and monastics that was established after the Pali Suttas were completed), and then to others nearby, and so on to everybody in the world, and to everybody in all universes.[citation needed]
A Cavern of Treasures (mDzod-phug)
A Cavern of Treasures (Tibetan: མཛོད་ཕུགWylie: mdzod phug) is a Bonpo terma uncovered by Shenchen Luga (Tibetan: གཤེན་ཆེན་ཀླུ་དགའWylie: gshen-chen klu-dga') in the early eleventh century. A segment of it enshrines a Bonpo evocation of the four immeasurables.[20] Martin (n.d.: p. 21) identifies the importance of this scripture for studies of the Zhang-Zhung language.[21]
Origins
Prior to the advent of the Buddha, according to Martin Wiltshire, the pre-Buddhist traditions of Brahma-loka, meditation and these four virtues are evidenced in both early Buddhist and non-Buddhist literature.[22] The early Buddhist texts assert that pre-Buddha ancient Indian sages who taught these virtues were earlier incarnations of the Buddha.[22] Post-Buddha, these same virtues are found in the Hindu texts such as verse 1.33 of the Yoga Sutras of Patañjali.[23]
Three of the four immeasurables, namely Maitri, Karuna and Upeksha, are found in the early Upanishads of Hinduism, while all four are found with slight variations – such as pramoda instead of mudita – in Jainism literature, states Wiltshire.[24] The ancient Indian Paccekabuddhas mentioned in the early Buddhist Suttas, those who lived before the Buddha, mention all "four immeasurables" and Brahmavihara, and they are claimed in the Suttas to be previous incarnations of the Buddha.[22]
According to Peter Harvey, the Buddhist scriptures acknowledge that the four Brahmavihara meditation practices "did not originate within the Buddhist tradition".[25] The Buddha never claimed that the "four immeasurables" were his unique ideas, in a manner similar to "cessation, quieting, nirvana".[11]
The pre-Buddha Chandogya Upanishad, states Jayatilleke, in section 8.15 teaches metta and ahimsa to all creatures claiming that this practice leads to Brahmaloka.[26] The shift in Vedic ideas, from rituals to virtues, is particularly discernible in the early Upanishadic thought, and it is unclear as to what extent and how early Upanishadic traditions of Hinduism and Sramanic traditions such as Buddhism and Jainism influenced each other, on ideas such as "four immeasurables", meditation and Brahmavihara.[22]
In an authoritative Jain scripture, the Tattvartha Sutra (Chapter 7, sutra 11), there is a mention of four right sentiments: Maitri, pramoda, karunya, madhyastha:
Benevolence towards all living beings, joy at the sight of the virtuous, compassion and sympathy for the afflicted, and tolerance towards the insolent and ill-behaved.

Beratan Lake and Ulun Danu Temple




Bali Ulun Danu Beratan Temple is a temple dedicated to the goddess of the lake is Ida Batari Dewi Ulun Danu on the edge of a huge crater. The dominant shrines are Meru’s (pagodas) dedicated to the lake goddess and the gods of Mount Batur and Mount Gunung Agung, the largest volcano in Bali. The temple was built in the 17th century in worship of the main Hindu trinity, Brahma-Vishnu-Shiva, as well as the lake goddess, Dewi Danu. The sight and cool atmosphere of the Bali uplands have made the lake and this temple a favourite sightseeing and recreational spot as well as a frequently photographed site. Ulun Danu Beratan Temple, literally ‘the source temple of Lake Beratan’, is easily the island’s most iconic sanctuary sharing the scenic qualities with the seaside temples of Uluwatu Temple and Tanah Lot Temple. The smooth reflective surface of the lake surrounding most of the temple’s base creates a unique floating impression, while the mountain range of the Bedugul region encircling the lake provides the temple with a scenic backdrop.


Ulun Danu Beratan Temple mostly called as a Ulun Danu Temple but not to be confused with Ulun Danu Batur Temple, which is on the rim of the caldera at Batur Lake. It is especially important for the Balinese. Only here can you get holy water of a particular variety. The water is collected from the lake itself, directly in front of the temple. Visitors have to wear a sash and not go near. Bathing is forbidden. The lake is the ultimate source of water for the rivers and springs that irrigate central Bali. It is therefore of the utmost importance. The temple priests say that the lake is fed by springs located at each of the wind directions. Each of the springs is the origin of water for that particular region of central Bali. So, farmers from North Bali collect their holy water from the northern spring of the lake and so on. Ulun Danu Temple lies by the western banks of Lake Bratan in the Bedugul Highlands at a level of 1239m, is one of the most picturesque and most photographed temples in Bali. Ulun Danu is inside the caldera of the now extinct volcano Gunung Catur. It is one of the main sources of irrigation in the Balinese highlands, and so the temple is dedicated to Dewi Danu, the lake goddess.


History of Ulun Danu Beratan Temple

Price

Rp 700.000/car

 

Price Includes

Petrol

Private Car (Full AC)

English Speaking Driver

Price Excludes

Parking Fee up to IDR 5.000

Entrance Ticket

Tipping Driver

Mineral Water

Lunch

Diner

Tour Guide

Hotel